Support

The Foundation works nationally to support those affected by terrorism and conflict. With over 20 years of experience, we believe that addressing the causes of violence before, during and after conflict situations is the most effective way possible to promote peace. Our projects and programmes work within three main areas; prevention, resolution and response.

Support Categories

Holding Difficult Conversations

A training workshop that builds confidence and expertise around how vulnerability can lead to violent extremism.  This training can be tailored for any workplace where...

A training workshop that builds confidence and expertise around how vulnerability can lead to violent extremism.  This training can be tailored for any workplace where recognising vulnerability and understanding good practice in holding relevant conversations are valuable additions to the professional tool-kit. Holding Difficult Conversations is for anyone… seeking to raise awareness and understanding about how vulnerability can lead to violent extremism and to consider how this fits into good safeguarding practice; who wants to build confidence and experience in managing uncomfortable issues as they arise; who wants to develop and practice skills in holding difficult conversations about extremism and conflict and embed this in organisational practice. The programme covers these key points: Awareness of how vulnerability can lead to radicalisation and what we can do. Understanding the triggers to extreme attitudes and behaviour and our responses to them. Managing unexpected conversations and behaviour. Opening a dialogue that challenges prejudice constructively without shutting discussion down and promotes alternative ways of thinking. Planning for future dialogue – embedding dialogue into practice. Our approach to learning involves highly interactive group work and skills practice. Participants also get to learn from each other and network with colleagues they might not otherwise meet.

Further Support, Portfolio, Services,

Women for Peace – We’re recruiting participants!

Are you a woman living in Sheffield or Leeds? Are you interested in joining our Women for Peace projects starting January 2018? What will you...

Are you a woman living in Sheffield or Leeds? Are you interested in joining our Women for Peace projects starting January 2018? What will you gain? A FREE course A new group of female friends Level 2 Open Awards Accreditation Enhanced skills in conflict resolution and problem solving Increased understanding to respond to local issues and participate in social action Strengthened capacity to be an active peacebuilder We are looking for: Women of any race, religion, ethnicity or age Leeds or Sheffield based Keen to improve peacebuilding and leadership skills Want to make positive changes at home and in the local community Course aims The course will cover the following topics: Critical thinking skills Self-awareness and identity Conflict resolution skills Understanding extremism Confidence and ability to share opinions and experiences Structure Women for Peace will consist of 10 sessions in either Leeds or Sheffield, once a week for 3 hours. A meal will be provided at each session, and a crèche if required. About our work The Tim Parry Johnathan Ball Peace Foundation was founded by the parents of 12 year old Tim Parry and supported by the parents of 3 year old Johnathan Ball. Both Tim and Johnathan were tragically killed as a direct result of the IRA’s 1993 bombing of Warrington. The Foundation works nationally and internationally for peace and nonviolent conflict resolution. More information To find out more, and to ask any questions please reach out to Hannah Larn at the Tim Parry Johnathan Ball Peace Foundation. Email: hannah.larn@foundation4peace.org Telephone: 07572 975949

Women For Peace

The Tim Parry Johnathan Ball Peace Foundation believes that women play powerful roles in preventing violent extremism and creating peace in society, but sometimes lack...

The Tim Parry Johnathan Ball Peace Foundation believes that women play powerful roles in preventing violent extremism and creating peace in society, but sometimes lack the opportunities and the confidence to do so. Women for Peace aims to empower women to confidently tackle extremism and build peace in their communities. The programme looks to support women from diverse backgrounds to become more active citizens by realising the voice they have can make a real difference. These women can then lead the way in preventing violence conflict and building peace through challenging destructive narratives and engaging in intercultural dialogue. The programme: Women for Peace is a 10-week programme where the group meet once a week for three hours. During the sessions, the group explores identity and belonging, prejudice and discrimination, conflict resolution and peacebuilding, and leadership skills. On completion of the course, including certain assessed activities, participants receive a Level 2 Open Awards qualification in Understanding Conflict and Extremism: Building Peace. As part of the sessions, participants take part in a wide range of activities, including: Dialogue and exploration of views: understanding grievances and challenging narratives Simulations, role-plays and putting strategies into practice based on real life experiences Interactive sessions and exercises for kinaesthetic learning, interspersed with group and individual reflection Creation of participants’ media and the articulation of their own narratives on contemporary issues Impact so far: To date, Women for Peace has run in Liverpool, Leeds, Sheffield, Kirklees, Burnley, Blackburn, Nelson and Oldham. Upon finishing the project, some women who use English as a second, third or sometimes fourth language have made substantial progress in their language skills, which was developed through their public speaking about difficult and complicated issues and interaction with other women from their local communities. Suzanne, a participant in Liverpool, explains how she shared her knew knowledge with those around her: “I shared this graph with my friend as I could identify how it fit her pattern of behaviour. She took this well and told me it was helpful to see this. I encouraged her for being more willing to ‘step out of her comfort zone’ and make some significant changes in her life. It’s marvellous to be able to share aspects of the course with others, including our close friends.” Juliana, a participant in Young Women for Peace designed specifically for 16-24 year olds, shared her experience: “I’m very proud of what I was able to achieve in our local community because it brought everyone together. Every young woman has the influence to build peace in their community.” For further information about this project, contact the team at commissions@foundation4peace.org, or take a look at the project’s Twitter page @Women4P.

Portfolio,

#WeStandTogether

The #WeStandTogether campaign was launched following the 2017 attacks in London and Manchester as a national initiative promoting community cohesion and unity. The ultimate aim is...

The #WeStandTogether campaign was launched following the 2017 attacks in London and Manchester as a national initiative promoting community cohesion and unity. The ultimate aim is to encourage people to come together as one and celebrate their differences in order to build a safer and stronger United Kingdom. “All of our thoughts are with the victims, the injured and their loved ones following the recent attacks, clear acts of terrorism. The attacks targeted innocent people who lived their lives together, in Manchester children, young people and families enjoying a fun night out were targeted – it is hard to think of anything more depraved”. “As we have seen following past atrocities, in the hours after the communities around London and Manchester have come together showing bravery and resilience to help those caught up in the incident. We can do no better than to follow the example of the emergency services, community groups, local businesses and ordinary people who went out of their way to care for fellow citizens and strangers in their time of need.” “There are those that want to intimidate and divide us through violence and hatred, but we know that they will always fail. London and Manchester won’t allow it, this country won’t allow it, none of us will allow it. We stand together, in grief, but united and resolute”. - Nick Taylor, Chief Executive We are leading a campaign called #WeStand Together – please join us by displaying the logo, joining us on Social Media Like us on Facebook and share the films, pictures and thoughts – search We Stand Together Follow us on Twitter @peacecentre and retweet and post messages of support Share your pictures, thoughts and actions – We Stand Together is more than just a set of words. Use the hashtag #WeStandTogether  To obtain a copy of the logo sign up at the bottom of this page

Campaigns,

Radicalisation Awareness Network

The Foundation’s work, reach, and experience in the field of conflict resolution and peace building has grown significantly in recent years. We are well placed...

The Foundation’s work, reach, and experience in the field of conflict resolution and peace building has grown significantly in recent years. We are well placed to respond to some of the contemporary challenges facing our communities. Predominantly our engagement has been at a grass roots level, yet our strategy and approach has influenced wider practice and policy makers charged with addressing and tackling issues around cohesion and extremism. The Foundation continues to contribute to the European Commission’s Radicalisation Awareness Network Prevent working groups, chiefly the Youth, Families and Communities working group, and is a partner in the RAN Centre for Excellence EU wide partnership. Working with a network of almost 2000 practitioners, the Foundation has been able to help shape policy and practice at International as well as at domestic levels. In an era of unprecedented attacks taking place all over the world as well as in our own country, the Foundations’ experience of working with victims and survivors has also been key in helping provide tailored and vital services for communities and individuals affected by terrorism. Violent extremism and the ongoing conflict in countries such as Syria and Iraq have presented major challenges for institutions, communities and governments all over the world. We recognise that our learning has relevance and resonance in these contexts so, as and when useful, we reach out across the UK and the EU to help inform practice that can safeguard our communities and build resilience in our young people. Visit the RAN website here 

Further Support,

Bespoke Services

The Peace Foundation offers multiple, ready-to-go, off-the-shelf, complementary and tailored interventions in the prevention, resolution, and response to violent conflict. We provide what commissioners need...

The Peace Foundation offers multiple, ready-to-go, off-the-shelf, complementary and tailored interventions in the prevention, resolution, and response to violent conflict. We provide what commissioners need to meet the contemporary challenges of community conflict and extremism. Our portfolio consists of a number of active offerings addressing acute areas of contemporary need. These projects are being delivered now for a variety of commissioners and can be adapted and expanded to meet demand. Commissioners can choose which they need, and the Foundation for Peace will appropriately tailor the projects(s) as they are modular. They’re designed to fit together to offer comprehensive before/during/after conflict solutions. Additionally, we have other tried-and-tested offerings from twenty years of experience, on the shelf and ready to deliver. You can email us at commissions@foundation4peace.org if you have any questions for our team.

Consultancy,

Survivors Assistance Network

Have you or someone you know been affected by an act of terrorism at home or abroad? Do you struggle to find people who understand...

Have you or someone you know been affected by an act of terrorism at home or abroad? Do you struggle to find people who understand what you have been through? The ‘Survivors Assistance Network’, run by the Peace Foundation, provides free practical and emotional support to individuals and families affected by a terrorist incident. Assistance is offered via telephone, email and face-to face-visits. Upon referral, a SAN caseworker will be allocated to undertake an initial assessment of needs and in some circumstances, a mental health consultant will work in collaboration with the SAN caseworker to provide specialist recommendations.   AIMS OF THE SURVIVORS ASSISTANCE NETWORK To provide a comprehensive assessment of the needs of individuals and families To identify and coordinate local and national statutory and non-statutory services to meet the specific needs of individuals and families To develop a personalised package of care for referrals based on an assessment of their needs To advise individuals of, and promote their engagement with, relevant and specialist support services To act as an advocate in ensuring that those affected are provided with relevant and appropriate support To work in partnership with a range of agencies to provide support to those affected To facilitate tailored programmes of Trauma Education for families affected by terrorism To develop and deliver group work and training in areas such as Leadership, Dialogue and Conflict Resolution, to equip survivors with skills to take back into families, the workplace and the wider community To facilitate the sharing of experiences and dialogue where appropriate to the needs of survivors   Visit the SAN website here 

Services,

Radical Dialogue

The Foundation’s ‘Rethinking Radicalisation’ program in a major city in the North of England has seen us in dialogue with civil society, community representatives, civic...

The Foundation’s ‘Rethinking Radicalisation’ program in a major city in the North of England has seen us in dialogue with civil society, community representatives, civic leaders and the authorities in an attempt to explore issues of radicalisation and related topics such as hate crime and islamophobia. Also to vision as well as plan concrete ways in which these issues can be tackled. The report today called for ‘greater efforts’ from civil society in helping to tackle the issue. Another challenge here, however, is that of trust. The fear is that by trying to help, those people they report become criminalised and spied upon. In other cases, they themselves are held up as government spies in doing so. The Guardian reported the difficulties in implementing Channel effectively in a story today about a 14- year- old boy who was questioned by his school about ISIS after a classroom discussion on environmental activism. Further evidence of the fact it is important to approach these issues with sensitivity and sound Further evidence of the fact it is important to approach these issues with sensitivity and sound judgement. Whether that was exercised in this case or not, the young person concerned was left feeling ‘fearful’ and ‘nervous’ as a result of the questioning he received.